Installation, updates, general problem solving and assistance.
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2016-04-03 18:26 »


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2016-04-04 00:48 »

Almost 3 hours... still can't change a simple thing, alter screen resolution!!! ...but hey, they can install some crappy games! Go priorities! Fucking assholes, fucking bastards! Fucking incompetent fucks! Who? Whoever the FUCK made Linux and openSUSE and all the rest of the motherfucking distributions.

Fuck you ALL. Yes, FUCK MICROSOFT TOO!

THEY ARE ALL INSANE!

Almost 30 fucking years and STILL, a simple task such as changing resolution needs "googling".

Fuck you all motherfuckers.

At least with Windows, I am STILL empowered as a user to ALTER IT AS I LIKE... AND I CAN AT LEAST CHANGE THE MOTHERFUCKING RESOLUTION IN LESS THAN 10 SECONDS!

Anyway, long story short, Linux is NOT ready for a desktop use yet. Maybe in another 30 years. *lol*

I will have to settle with Windows 10 for now, killing the spyware in Windows 10 took me LESS HOURS THAN TRYING TO CHANGE SCREEN RESOLUTION IN OPENSUSE! trololololol... what a fucking joke!

:wave:

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2016-04-04 01:06 »

Ps. Because in business, saving TIME is a HUGE deal. So I can kill the spyware in Windows 10 in maybe 1 hour but 3 hours ONLY TO ALTER RESOLUTION IN OPENSUSE... WHICH BY THE WAY, FAILED AND DIDN'T WORK! (Using Hyper-V). ...but hey, they can install games and all kinds of CRAP by default! LOL! What a fucking joke.

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PROBLEMCHYLD
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2016-04-04 01:42 »

Slackware is your friend, probably the most complicated distro and I will be breezing thru it soon. I love complications when I have some help. I'm not an one man army. So thanks for all of the support from all over the globe. :clap: :clap: :thumbup: :mrgreen:

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2016-04-04 16:41 »

Problem with Slackware is that my host doesn't support it so can't use it but I heard it is definitely really good. I'll be giving FreeBSD another try and see how that one goes. My biggest issue is that I must run these inside Hyper-V because I only have one PC. The PC is running Windows 10 for my games and I have Hyper-V in it to run my "main" PC as a virtual PC inside this physical PC. Currently, the virtual PC, which is my main runs on Windows 10 x64 Enterprise (I have a license) and I have killed ALL of its spywares. Not even Windows Update runs on it so it's fine and dandy, works great.

Since I lost my job, not sure if I can afford to keep my license for next years, hence my thoughts of switching to *nix. Anyway, openSUSE Leap seemed "OK" but it had issues with running as a virtual PC. I don't remember how FreeBSD was but I hope that one won't have same issues.

If I get the sound and graphics resolution to what I need (Full HD 1920x1280) then I should be good. With openSUSE Leap, it failed and doesn't seem to be able to do it in Hyper-V. I hope FreeBSD won't have this issue, if it has, I will put another 2-3 hours but beyond that, I will continue to run Windows 10 in that case for a while longer.

Beside the gaming, I use Windows 10 on main PC for two other reasons: BitLocker encryption (for the server) and also, ReFS file system. I really like ReFS file system, it basically keeps my bits "safe" from bit rot (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_degradation). :think:

But I can always use some other OS as my main inside a virtual machine because my files would still be on the ReFS file system outside of the virtual machine and I would reach them by an internal network.

Oh God, wall of text... *lol* ...long story short, I'll give FreeBSD another shot. :mrgreen:

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PROBLEMCHYLD
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2016-04-04 17:02 »

Try out DragonFly BSD.

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2016-04-04 18:58 »

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DragonFly_BSD : Many concepts planned for DragonFly were inspired by the AmigaOS operating system. :clap: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: ...sadly, my host only supports FreeBSD (and OpenBSD I think). I must use whatever they use. :neutral:

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2016-10-02 09:36 »

This comment, another excellent reason why FreeBSD is much better than most Linux distros. In my humble opinion, if anyone is moving away from Windows, there will surely be pain on that road, lots of pain... so the pain might as well be for something really good, like FreeBSD.

It seems that most major Linux distros are adapting "systemd" which seems to be turning into a horror show (multiple Linux distributions affected by crippling bug in systemd), very much like Windows.

https://forums.freebsd.org/threads/49372/

I come from a decade of using Linux and spent a couple of those years building my own variant, attempting to get a system that was capable of building itself up from sources in a bare chroot, and for which the "options" provided by the source code (e.g. the option to support NLS or openSSL, or not) were all exposed to the user and were actually options in the system (i.e. to actually take advantage of having "open source"). In Linux that is a difficult problem. In the Linux ecosystem each "distro" is dependent on almost the totality of itself: you can build new versions of packages only within a running system that has the whole system. The smallest starting point is a pre-existing binary image that contains hundreds or even more than a thousand packages. Even Gentoo now can only be developed by starting with a "Stage 3 tarball" that installs about 500 MB of executables and libraries. In a Linux distro it is difficult to cross-compile the system, and creation of static binaries is not supported. Updating the toolchain can be hazardous. A modern Linux system is like the American electrical grid, the system depends upon _itself_. If it were to "go down" completely no one knows how to bring it back up.

This really came home to me when I tried to develop tools and a process for building a rather standard Linux distro (Archlinux) starting with just a basic toolchain (a libc, binutils, a compiler). It was very difficult because the core of a Linux distro is rife with cyclic dependencies. They don't bother to address those cyclic dependencies as layering violations nor do they develop a build process for working around them. So even though a LInux distro is Just a Pile of Packages and a Kernel, thousands of independently developed packages cobbled together by the "distro", the user/developer can't treat them as independent. (For example, you can't build and install packages without a package manager but the package manager generally depends on much higher levels than just the toolchain. In Gentoo portage depends on python, amongst other high level things, and in Arch pacman depends on gpgme/gnupg etc.. It's hard to bootstrap such a system. It's hard to make fundamental changes.)

When I threw systemd into the mix the layering violations became much worse (e.g. systemd pulls in dbus, which depends on systemd). Actually I hit a brick wall in trying to build a modern Linux system, with a package manager, starting from the toolchain and c library. Of course it is possible to build a small specialized or even embedded linux system that does build static toolchains and can be built from the ground up, e.g. Sabotage Linux that uses a homebrew package manager that requires only the toolchain, and can build static binaries. Such Linux projects are very marginal, generally die after a short time, and are not where Linux is heading.

After a decade I came back to BSD. As I did a decade ago, I was able to "svn checkout" the latest FreeBSD src and ports and build my complete system from source code with options needed for my goal, only this time with a very nice ZFS mirror filesystem. Here I have the advantage that the system, even if distributed as a complete graphical system by PCBSD folks, is always built from the toolchain up, the build process automatically builds the intermediate cross-tools (in /src/obj) and allows complete freedom to take advantage of the source code, and without layering violations. Here it is a natural result of the process that options in the source code can be given "knobs" so that the optional features are exposed and the "lego" nature of the architecture makes evolution always possible. In other words, it still seems to have the advantage of being Unix and I hope that evolution of FreeBSD will continue to have that building block nature. It seems to me that systemd is NOT a building block; it is intent on being The System, as if it were invented by a corporation whose main source of income were the U.S. Navy and the NSA.

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2016-10-07 09:22 »

Hahahhahaaa damn you PROBLEMCHYLD!!! WHY DIDN'T YOU TELL ME ABOUT ARCH LINUX SOONER? Just joking of course, you told me long ago... hehehhehehe... I failed with FreeBSD, it cannot play nice under Hyper-V. Giving Arch a try now, so far, looks very nice and clean! :thumbup: :clap: :thumbup:

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PROBLEMCHYLD
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2017-07-30 07:21 »

This guy is an asshole sometimes, but he does great work on linux.

https://translate.google.com/translate? ... rev=search

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