Installation, updates, general problem solving and assistance.
jiaotongnan

2019-04-26 04:50 »

Hey,
I'm trying to get Windows XP installed on a Bay Trail-M CPU computer. So far I've found compatible drivers but I am running into ONE problem: ACPI.sys. I must figure out how to replace that file in the Windows XP files. The problem is that the ACPI.SY file is in an LZX:21 archive. I cannot just simply compress a file then give it the original extension because the Windows XP setup would detect it as corrupt!

Does anyone know how to recompress a file to an LZX:21 archive? It's the only file hampering me from installing Windows XP on a 2014 computer!
Thank you!

User avatar
Steven W
VIP
Posts: 1208
Joined: 2013-08-10 22:40

2019-04-26 05:15 »

Not sure that I'll be of much help, but can you give us the model of the computer. Have you tried installing already, if so what happens? Can you get far enough to boot in Safe Mode? You should look and see what options there are regarding ACPI in the BIOS. Check for updates to the BIOS.

Are you seeing errors like the following?

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/hel ... windows-xp

User avatar
Steven W
VIP
Posts: 1208
Joined: 2013-08-10 22:40

2019-04-26 06:20 »

Let me touch on a few obvious and a couple of not so obvious things:

I've seen stupid crap like a dead CMOS battery cause problems with ACPI, essentially you losing settings. I've heard memory issues can cause problems. I'm assuming this is XP 32-bit and you have 4GB or less or RAM. Easy way to make sure it isn't the battery, is check date/time in BIOS reboot and make sure it's keeping time, more thorough approach, unplug PC for a couple of hours and make sure it's keeping time. I'd pop the hood and makes sure the RAM is seated well, perhaps even reset it. Make sure it all reported in BIOS (turn on Memory Check during boot if it's available).

Now the not so obvious:

If all else fails, sensibly disable power options in the BIOS (if you can), possibly put any SATA controllers in Legacy Mode (again, if you can) and when installing XP and you get to this screen:
f6-1.png
f6-1.png (2.73 KiB) Viewed 371 times
Press F7 (yes, I said F7)

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/hel ... ction-keys

and choose the Standard PC option.

Despite what many say you can change your ACPI options later:

https://zedt.eu/tech/windows/switch-win ... reinstall/

http://praetas.blogspot.com/2012/08/del ... p-can.html

You can download proper storage drivers (often just included in chipset files from Intel) extract the somewhere (make it easy to point to and remember where), boot to Safe Mode remove drivers for (sometimes just delete devices altogether) for the device manager, reboot change setting from Legacy to SATA and when Windows asks for drivers point to the folder where you extracted files.

It's obviously difficult to diagnose problems without being there, but hopefully all this helps. Good luck!

User avatar
Steven W
VIP
Posts: 1208
Joined: 2013-08-10 22:40

2019-04-26 06:25 »

Steven W wrote:
2019-04-26 06:20
for the device manager,
for the device manager = from the device manager

It's getting late! :yawn:

JiaoTongNan

2019-04-26 06:49 »

Steven W wrote:
2019-04-26 06:20
Let me touch on a few obvious and a couple of not so obvious things:

I've seen stupid crap like a dead CMOS battery cause problems with ACPI, essentially you losing settings. I've heard memory issues can cause problems. I'm assuming this is XP 32-bit and you have 4GB or less or RAM. Easy way to make sure it isn't the battery, is check date/time in BIOS reboot and make sure it's keeping time, more thorough approach, unplug PC for a couple of hours and make sure it's keeping time. I'd pop the hood and makes sure the RAM is seated well, perhaps even reset it. Make sure it all reported in BIOS (turn on Memory Check during boot if it's available).

Now the not so obvious:

If all else fails, sensibly disable power options in the BIOS (if you can), possibly put any SATA controllers in Legacy Mode (again, if you can) and when installing XP and you get to this screen:

f6-1.png

Press F7 (yes, I said F7)

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/hel ... ction-keys

and choose the Standard PC option.

Despite what many say you can change your ACPI options later:

https://zedt.eu/tech/windows/switch-win ... reinstall/

http://praetas.blogspot.com/2012/08/del ... p-can.html

You can download proper storage drivers (often just included in chipset files from Intel) extract the somewhere (make it easy to point to and remember where), boot to Safe Mode remove drivers for (sometimes just delete devices altogether) for the device manager, reboot change setting from Legacy to SATA and when Windows asks for drivers point to the folder where you extracted files.

It's obviously difficult to diagnose problems without being there, but hopefully all this helps. Good luck!
I've already tried using f5 and f7 options without success. The computer is a Dell Inspiron 20 3034 All-in-One with a Bay Lake-M CPU.


Despite finding a ACPI.sys fix on MSFN, can't just simply replace the ACPI.sys located in i386 because the driver is located in a LZX:21 archived called "ACPI.SY_".
I tried manually replacing the file with a compressed folder and changed the name and extension, but no luck: Windows XP setup says the file is corrupt then...

https://msfn.org/board/topic/178362-ins ... BB%BF-cpu/
https://msfn.org/board/topic/178368-mod ... zx-format/

JiaoTongNan

2019-04-26 06:50 »

Also, I used this custom SATA driver. It got me past the SATA error but now the ACPI error is present. When I use the f5 and f7 options, I only get another error..

User avatar
Steven W
VIP
Posts: 1208
Joined: 2013-08-10 22:40

2019-04-26 07:15 »

I go to get ready for bed and, of course, another thought pops in my head. Such is life. One of the things we need to nail down is when the failure occurs.

If it happens to be when Windows goes to boot for the first time, you may have a few options:

Somehow get the file you need on a small partition before installing Windows, booting the CD to the Recover Console and replacing the necessary file.

Using a Linux live CD to download or access and replace the file from a thumb drive, etc.

Heck, it might be possible to create a 98 or 98se boot disk with the XP install and your file on it.

I have to jump through a number of hoops like this to make 98SE install on a fairly modern machine.

Again, good luck!

User avatar
Steven W
VIP
Posts: 1208
Joined: 2013-08-10 22:40

2019-04-26 07:19 »

JiaoTongNan wrote:
2019-04-26 06:50
Also, I used this custom SATA driver. It got me past the SATA error but now the ACPI error is present. When I use the f5 and f7 options, I only get another error..
Okay, sorry for the last reply, didn't notice your reply. Although, it may still be relevant. Okay, what error are you getting? When are you getting it (after windows installation, first boot...). What options do you have in the BIOS, regarding ACPI/Power settings?

JiaoTongNan

2019-04-26 07:21 »

If anyone's interested, it appears rloew has provided a fix!
https://msfn.org/board/topic/178368-mod ... zx-format/

"CABARC -m LZX:21 N ACPI.SY_ ACPI.SYS"
He uses CABARC instead of makecab.exe...I'm still unsure where to obain that...

User avatar
Steven W
VIP
Posts: 1208
Joined: 2013-08-10 22:40

2019-04-26 07:24 »

Okay, I see from the MSFN post that you're getting the 0x0000007B - that's specifically the boot device. Have you tried Legacy Mode?

Post Reply